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A colony of about a thousand cells of the first human embryonic stem cell line called H1 growing on mouse feeder cells. The white line shows the distance of one tenth of a millimeter.



 

A colony of about a thousand cells of the first human embryonic stem cell line called H1 genetically engineered with the jellyfish gene that glows in the dark. The white line shows the distance of one tenth of a millimeter.



 

The clock of human cellular aging resides in the telomeres, the structures seen artificially illuminated here at the ends of the chromosomes. In the same manner that a fuse can act as a timing device, so the length of these structures set at the embryonic stages of life set the replicative lifespan of human body cell types.




Rejuvenated iPS cells made from somatic cells that had shortened telomeres. The cells are stained here with antibody to OCT4 (a marker of germ-line cells).

      Rejuvenated iPS cells made from somatic cells that had shortened telomeres. The cells are stained here with antibody to SSEA4 (stage-specific embryonic antigen-4).

 

This shows in a simplified form, the dichotomy of the germ-line and somatic cells. The germ-line cells that perpetuate the species in an immortal fashion are shown colored green. The somatic cells that make up the body of each individual are shown in black and labeled "Soma." Examples of somatic cells would be blood, liver, and brain cells. The natural fate of somatic cells is to be a disposable transport vehicle for the germ-line.

 

Osiris British Museum video...
Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum No. 9901


Michael D. West Ph. D.



 




Time Orders Old Age to Destroy Beauty by Pompeo Batoni (1708-1787) The National Gallery, London.

 

Michael D. West Ph. D.



         
        




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